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Web Ecology An open-access peer-reviewed journal
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Volume 16, issue 1
Web Ecol., 16, 51–58, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-16-51-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Web Ecol., 16, 51–58, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-16-51-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Standard article 11 Feb 2016

Standard article | 11 Feb 2016

Impacts of land-use intensification on litter decomposition in western Kenya

G. H. Kagezi et al.

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Tropical forests are faced with a loss of forest cover with effects on ecosystem processes. We quantified decomposition within forest fragments and sites affected by increasing levels of agricultural land-use intensity. Mass loss increased with the area of forest fragments and decreased with land-use intensification. Fragmentation has negative effects on litter decomposition. However, the magnitude of this negative effect was not as large as expected.
Tropical forests are faced with a loss of forest cover with effects on ecosystem processes. We...
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