Journal cover Journal topic
Web Ecology An open-access peer-reviewed journal
Web Ecol., 16, 1-2, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-16-1-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Short communication
18 Jan 2016
The first shoots of a modern morphometrics approach to the origins of agriculture
V. Bonhomme1,2, E. Forster3, M. Wallace3, E. Stillman1, M. Charles4, and G. Jones3 1School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH, UK
2UMR 5554 Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution, équipe Dynamique de la biodiversité, anthropo-écologie, Université de Montpellier, CNRS, IRD, EPHE Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, CEDEX 05, France
3Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, Northgate House, West Street, Sheffield S1 4ET, UK
4Institute of Archaeology, 36 Beaumont St, Oxford, OX1 2PG, UK
Abstract. No abstract available.

Citation: Bonhomme, V., Forster, E., Wallace, M., Stillman, E., Charles, M., and Jones, G.: The first shoots of a modern morphometrics approach to the origins of agriculture, Web Ecol., 16, 1-2, https://doi.org/10.5194/we-16-1-2016, 2016.
Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
The transition from a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one of settled agriculture is arguably the most fundamental change in the development of human society (Lev-Yadun et al., 2000). The establishment of agricultural economies, emerging initially in the Fertile Crescent of the Near East (Nesbitt, 2002), required the domestication of crops; ancient plant remains recovered from early farming sites provide direct evidence for this process of domestication.
The transition from a mobile hunter-gatherer lifestyle to one of settled agriculture is arguably...
Share