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Web Ecology An open-access peer-reviewed journal
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Volume 14, issue 1
Web Ecol., 14, 65-74, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-14-65-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Web Ecol., 14, 65-74, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/we-14-65-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Standard article 09 Jan 2015

Standard article | 09 Jan 2015

Drought resistance of native pioneer species indicates potential suitability for restoration of post-mining areas

N. Winkler1, W. Weymann2, H. Auge1, S. Klotz1, P. Finkenbein1, and H. Heilmeier2 N. Winkler et al.
  • 1Department of Community Ecology, UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Theodor-Lieser-Str. 4, 06120 Halle (Saale), Germany
  • 2Interdisciplinary Ecological Centre, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Str. 29, 09599 Freiberg, Germany

Abstract. In order to test whether invasive exotic species, predominantly used for restoring post-mining areas in north-eastern Vietnam, may be replaced by ecologically superior native pioneer species, we conducted a drought stress experiment in a greenhouse. We hypothesized that juvenile individuals of four native pioneer tree and two native pioneer grass species have a drought resistance comparable to two exotic reference species. Our results confirm this hypothesis: even under drought, native trees had a higher biomass and root : shoot ratio than exotic trees, although their maximum relative elongation rate and biomass were reduced more strongly than for exotic trees with respect to well-watered conditions. Native grasses had a higher root length density and a similar drought-induced reduction of stomatal conductance compared to exotic trees. In spite of a higher biomass reduction, native grasses produced more biomass under drought in absolute terms. Notwithstanding that further investigations of other adverse environmental factors need to be performed, our results indicate with respect to drought resistance that native pioneer species are a potential alternative to exotic species for the ecological restoration of subtropical post-mining areas, which may accelerate secondary succession.

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In order to test whether invasive exotic species, predominantly used for restoring post-mining areas in north-eastern Vietnam, may be replaced by ecologically superior native pioneer species, we conducted a drought stress experiment in a greenhouse. Our results indicate with respect to drought resistance that native pioneer species are a potential alternative to exotic species for the ecological restoration of subtropical post-mining areas, which may accelerate secondary succession.
In order to test whether invasive exotic species, predominantly used for restoring post-mining...
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